The Mitre, the Taqiyah, the Kippah, the Pileus & Vulcan’s cap

With hats it is, of course, useful to focus on the symbolic use of hats in Religion where it 
is evident they are developed consciously to serve a symbolic purpose. Possibly hats, as crowns and laurels, have a vaginal significance. Although here there is also a strong theme of concealment. To be clear, the two themes are not mutually exclusive. Quite the contrary, they are perhaps intrinsically linked.

We explicate this link, for example, with the symbol of the wooden ark, whether 
appearing with the baby Adonis, with the Ark of the Covenant or with Noah’s “Ark.” The
 symbol of the Ark, as this study explicates, is an Aryan vaginal symbol yet also a symbol, 
from the Jewish perspective, of racial camouflage or concealment. Here the element of
 wood signifies the Aryan element as this study explicates.

In the Religious context, the kippah, appearing in Judaism, and the taqiyah, appearing in
 Islam, are the most useful subjects of analysis. Here mitre’s or priestly hats appearing in 
Christianity are likely variations on a theme. This includes other symbols of “cover” such as the symbol of the
 umbraculum or “big umbrella”, a sunshade used to shade the pope during certain official ceremonies and appearing, as well, in papal iconography.  This sunshade, like these
 aforementioned hats, is a symbol of “covering” and “concealment.”

77561_mtr_evol_lg.gif
The above illustration depicts the understood evolution of the mitre from the 11th century to present day.  In its origin it was closer to the skullcap. 

Indeed, the shape of the papal mitre was in its origin closer to a skullcap.  The 19th century, anti-
Catholic Protestant minister Alexander Hislop claimed that the papal mitre “is the very mitre worn by the
 priests of Dagon, the fish-god of the Philistines and Babylonians.” [1] Here, it is posited,
 the distinctive twin peaked shape of the modern mitre is taken from the ancient Dagon
 cult where a two peaked hat or headdress was developed, very explicitly, to represent the open mouth of a fish.

To be sure, some ancient depictions of this Dagon headgear more closely resemble the “beakish” mitre than others.  Nevertheless, we shouldn’t consider the evolution of the mitre from another form to its present form disruptive of Hislop’s theory.  After all, JEM, and an intelligent deployment of symbolism by Jews, has been active through all periods including our own.

Dagon-Mitre.jpg
Alexander Hislop argued that the modern mitre was taken from the ancient Dagon
 cult.  To be sure, some ancient depictions of this Dagon headgear more closely resemble the “beakish” mitre than others.

Indeed, as this study explicates, the fresh water fish, river fish and Dagon, as symbols in 
JEM, signify the Aryan as consumable. This would seem, perhaps, consistent
 with other piscine symbolism that features saliently in papal symbolism such as, for example, the 
pope’s Piscatory Ring. Here the pope is understood as the spiritual heir of Peter and “the
 Fisher of Men.”

If Hislop’s connection is the correct one, ostensibly, this would assign the mitre a
 different meaning than the kippah or taqiyah. But ultimately this is actually untrue. Indeed, it seems 
likely the hat in the Religious context carries an inherent symbolism of concealment,
 inhabitation and even phallic insertion.

It may or may not be meaningful, for example,
 that the Greek word mitra, μίτρα, from which mitre is derived, originally described a piece 
of hoplite armor worn around the waist. In any case, even if we guess the mitre contains 
piscine symbolism, the pope or bishops as “fishers of men,” don’t become Aryan piscine
 figures through wearing these hats.  Rather they disguise themselves as Aryan piscine figures.

Perhaps, straightaway, the knowledgeable reader is drawn to the word taqiyah, طاقية.
 The word taqiyah, spelled also tagyia in English, is strikingly similar to the word, taqiya,
تقیة‎. Here we can be sure there is no “etymological coincidence” and word meanings 
tend to corroborate this.

Taqiyah.jpg
The word taqiyah, which describes the muslim Religious skullcap, is strikingly similar to the word taqiya, which describes a policy of dissimulation vis-a-vis non-Muslims.  Here we can be sure there is no “etymological coincidence” and word meanings 
tend to corroborate this.

In Islam, the principle of taqiya is the practice of concealing
 one’s faith and, implicitly, a clear understanding of it, when facing “Religious
 Persecution.” Hence, very clearly, we understand the cap of essentially the same name 
to represent a concept of concealment. Here one is hiding beneath a cap, particularly 
from higher, celestial or ruling native powers, residing “above.”

The taqiyah is a skullcap doubtlessly imitative of the Jewish kippah. It is derived from 
the Persian word ṭāq, طاق, meaning “dome” or “arch.” The kippah, כִּפָּה/כִּיפָּה, likewise 
is indicated as meaning “dome” or “arch.” Kippah also means “skull cap”, “cap”,
“cupola”, “vault”, “knoll” and “palm.” Since we assume a Jewish hand or influence in the development of the key symbols of Islam, doubtlessly the corresponding Jewish
 kippah is likewise a symbol of crypsis. This is corroborated by the ubiquitous theme of
 crypsis in JEM.

To be sure, both the kippah and the taqiyah are posited exoterically as symbols of 
“humility” or “fear of God.” Indeed, the term yarmulke, a Yiddish word for kippah, is
 frequently felt to have been derived from the Aramaic phrase yare malka, ירא מלכא, 
meaning “fear the King.” “King” here is sometimes guessed to be a reference to the 
Jewish God. Though it seems as likely this “king” refers to the Aryan or non-Jewish
 potentate. After all, we understand the Jew believes himself esoterically as Yahweh as 
this study explicates.

In Arabic, the practice of taqiya means literally “prudence, fear.” Indeed, the kippah
 and taqiyah also appear, exoterically, as symbols of “humility.” Of course, a calculated,
 even temporary humility is merely another form of dissimulation or concealment. 
Hence these skullcaps are symbols of “false humility” in addition to dissimulation.

There are many striking things to consider here. With meanings like “dome”, “arch” and
 “knoll” appearing with the word kippah, we are given a sense of the chthonic. Here we
 find a mountain God, Yahweh, concealed, even underground, hiding from an Aryan Sky
 God above. Indeed, the hat, designed to protect from weather conditions, by itself, in 
the religious context, suggests a desire to conceal oneself from the judgment of Celestial
 Gods or forces.

With the meaning of “palm,” found with the word kippah, it seems plausible we see a 
reference to the open-palmed Hamsa, a symbol explicated in this study. Here it is just
 worth mentioning that the Hamsa is a symbol of blinding, blocking, concealment and 
theft, particularly genetic theft. In Islam, the taqiyah is worn especially during the “five daily prayers.” In JEM, the number five, as this study explicates, is especially a reference
to the five fingers of the Hamsa and a theme of blinding or deception.

Hence with a kippah or taqiyah the most amazing irony appears. Doubtlessly it was
 developed intentionally.  Donning one of these caps publicly is obviously an
 announcement of faith. Yet both are symbols of the concealment of faith or at least the
 concealment of mission. Here again JEM is heightened because one is announcing to 
their adversary that they are deceiving them, yet their adversary is too incurious,
 ignorant, terrified or dim-witted to understand.

Kippah example.jpg
With a kippah or taqiyah the most amazing irony appears.  Donning one of these caps publicly is obviously an
 announcement of faith. Yet both are symbols of the concealment of faith or at least the
 concealment of mission.

Hats and caps have a long religious history appearing in various ancient cults. Here, 
though, particularly when knowledge of ritual practice and garb is finite, it is useful
 to look at mythical figures. After all, these mythical figures may be understood as the
 most imitable models of their given cults particularly vis-à-vis priests. Indeed, in my
 estimation, it is clear that kippah is related to the pileus, a common traveling hat, 
associated with the mythical twin figures of the Dioskouroi.

Dioskouroi.jpg
In my
 estimation, it is clear that kippah is related to the pileus, a common traveling hat, 
associated with the mythical twin figures of the Dioskouroi.

The Cabeiri, from which the Dioskouri almost certainly derive, appeared first in Lemnos. 
Lemnos was unequivocally a site of proto-Jewish inhabitation as this study explicates.
 Indeed, the Cabeiri themselves were an offshoot of the proto-Jewish Vulcan cult 
indigenous to Lemnos. In fact, Vulcan himself is commonly depicted with a beard and 
an oval cap. It is a cap often bearing a striking resemblance to the kippah.

Vulcan 3.jpg
Vulcan himself is commonly depicted with a beard and 
an oval cap. It is a cap often bearing a striking resemblance to the kippah.  The Vulcan cult is, in my view, a clear proto-Jewish Cult.

The Phrygian cap, a typically larger pointed hat, is likely also related. In antiquity the 
Phrygian cap is depicted on the heads of the chthonic and Semitic figures of Eros and
 Orpheus. Both the pileus and Phrygian cap were understood as symbols of liberty and
 emancipation from slavery. The Semitic figure of Mercury likewise wore a “traveling
 hat” with a broad, floppy brim called the petasos. We can be sure it is the inspiration for the wizard’s hat of European folklore. Indeed, Mercury himself is the inspiration for 
the wizard. The name Merlin, for instance, may be derived from the name Mercury.

V06p293001 (1).jpg
Officially little is known about the use and development of Jewish headdress.  The Jewish Encyclopedia, published in 1906, depicts Jewish headdress worn in various countries from the 13th century to the modern era.  Fig. 3, 5, 11, 16 and 17 especially conjure the wizard or gnome’s hat.   All save Fig. 11. represent German Jews through the 13th to 15th centuries.  Fig. 11 is a depiction of a 15th century Dutch Jew. 

With the Semitic figures of Mercury and Pluto, we also understand hats or helmets as
 symbols of invisibility or, to be clear, Jewish or proto-Jewish crypsis. The mythical
 figures Pluto and Mercury both had helms or caps of invisibility. In modern JEM, the
 Ant-man character of Marvel comics, developed by Stan Lee, requires a special helmet 
to shrink down to insect size. This ability to shrink is certainly a reference to crypsis.

Ant-man helmet.png
As Stan Lee develops the character of the Ant-man, we understand that he requires his helmet to shrink.   This is mentioned, for instance, in the 2015 film Ant-man where Stan Lee served as an executive producer. 

In Western culture, it was, in the past, customary to doff the hat when indoors. It was 
also once customary, as well, to tip the hat upon encountering a woman. Both gestures,
 little considered, are ultimately gestures of revealing, of forthrightness, of baring one’s
 face.

The difficult truth is nothing demonstrates the principal of “Opaque Symbols as 
ipso facto demoralization” more than the kippah, which is itself a symbol of
 concealment, deception, hidden and ulterior motives. Hence, as a straight dealing people, interested only in other straight dealing people,
 there are few things we should regard as more offensive than the kippah.  Though let us remember as well, few Jews are aware of the meanings I explicate here.

 

[1] The Two Babylons, Hislop, p. 215

 

2 thoughts on “The Mitre, the Taqiyah, the Kippah, the Pileus & Vulcan’s cap

  1. The hat is something I’ve noticed as well. In modern times I believe it’s been reflected in both the pussy hats and the MAGA hat. Implying symbolic control on both sides of the political split.

    Like

    1. That’s a remarkable observation. In a sense, both hats, as in the ancient world, are symbols of liberty or emancipation. It appears to be a Jungian manifestation at least on the right. Though there is no hat more clearly vaginal than the “pussy hat.”

      Liked by 1 person

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