Burning Bush as a Reference to a Lover’s Tryst

If the burning bush is a reference to a “pagan” deity, the Semitic Fire God Vulcan would be the simplest candidate. After all, the bush is found “at Horeb” or Mount Sinai and this study reveals reasons to believe this a reference to Vulcan’s mythical Volcanic mountain forge. Additionally, it is burning.

Surely a consuming Fire God is here depicted if other metaphorical forms are also suggested. Since we understand Yahweh as a synonym of Vulcan, or Vulcan a form of Yahweh, surely Vulcan is also depicted. However, here, more specifically, with this striking symbolism, we encounter a “lover’s face” of the Jewish God. In Exodus 3, Moses’ encounter is described thusly:

“The angel of Yahweh appeared to him in a blazing fire from the midst of a bush; and he looked, and behold, the bush was burning with fire, yet the bush was not consumed. So Moses said, ‘I must turn aside now and see this marvelous sight, why the bush is not burned up.’ When Yahweh saw that he turned aside to look, God called to him from the midst of the bush and said, ‘Moses, Moses!’ And he said, ‘Here I am.’ Then He said, ‘Do not come near here; remove your sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.’ He said also, ‘I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.’ Then Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.”

It’s my speculation that the burning bush describes two lovers, a Jewish man and an Aryan woman, perhaps in a bush. Alternatively, the burning bush itself is a metaphor for the Aryan female element in this union, while the fire the Jewish male element. What are the reasons?

First, it is evident two distinct personages are being described, an Angel and a God. The common translations admit this. Second, as this book reveals, Angels, whom are messengers of the Jewish God, are understood in the esotericism as Aryan. Third, in passages above, save for the use of the word Yahweh, where indicated, all the occurrences of “God” may be translated in the plural. These words are elohim אֱלֹהִ֜ים, elohe, אֱלֹהֵ֧י, twice and ha’elohim, הָאֱלֹהִֽים. It is clear from our analysis of the Eden story and of the story of Samson and Delilah, to cite two examples, that Elohim appearing separately from Yahweh may be used, at least in some instances, to depict Gods distinct from the Jewish God.

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It is evident two distinct personages are being described, an Angel and a God. The common translations admit this. Second, as this book reveals, Angels, whom are messengers of the Jewish God, are understood in the esotericism as Aryan.

Fourthly, clearly both Moses’ manner and “God’s” manner suggests a scenario where a man has caught two lovers in the act. Fifthly, shortly after Moses intrusion, Yahweh will announce that he has appeared here to rescue his people from the Egyptians and bring them to Canaan, a land flowing with “milk and honey.” “Milk and honey” as this study will discuss, are clear references to sexually accessible Aryan women. Thus there, is at least, a thematic consistency here.

Finally, the “burning bush” that is “not consumed” is possibly an example of a color and plant symbolism describing a Semitic and Aryan union. Here the idea is that a “burning bush” is a bush that appears to be burning, such as a red flowered rose bush, yet is “not consumed.” As this study explicates, green stemmed, red flowered or berried plants are common in JEM as a means of indicating Aryan and Semitic admixture. To be clear, that it is “not consumed” is perhaps a riddle indicating that the bush is “fiery” in color, possessing fiery, berries, leaves or flowers.

Indeed, it may even be possible to guess the plant is being referenced here. One possibility is the Bacchanal Ivy bush. To wit, in the ancient world, a vintner or tavern owner would hang an ivy bush outside his shop to indicate that wine was sold there. It was a direct reference to Bacchus, the wine god, whom was associated with the plant. Again, the historical accounts also indicate Jews using grape clusters and ivy leaves as symbols. The “burning” could be a reference to red elements of this bush, such as ivy or bindweed berries or the red grapes of Bacchus’ grape vine. It might even be a reference to the burning sensation of alcohol. Among the Native Americans, the term “fire water” developed to capture this phenomenon.

Another perhaps more likely possibility is that the bush is a reference to a rose bush. Indeed, the word used in the Hebrew Bible is seneh, סְנֶה, which refers more specifically to a bramble. Roses would associate the bush or bramble to Adonis, whom, again, this study posits as a synonym of both Bacchus and the Jewish God. Again, the Jewish God is often called Adonai particularly by Religious Jews in lieu of the name Yahweh. This, of course, would almost automatically indicate the Angel in the bush as the Aryan Venus or Aphrodite. But, of course, we understand Isis, Ishtar, Inanna all to be synonyms of the Goddess. We presume as well that the lover here is female, yet other parables in the Biblical works, as this study reveals, will clearly indicate homosexual activity, albeit esoterically.

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One possibility is that the bush is a reference to a rose bush. Indeed, the word used in the Hebrew Bible is seneh, סְנֶה, which refers more specifically to a bramble. Roses would associate the bush or bramble to Adonis, whom, again, this study posits as a synonym of both Bacchus and the Jewish God. Again, the Jewish God is often called Adonai particularly by Religious Jews in lieu of the name Yahweh. This, of course, would almost automatically indicate the Angel in the bush as the Aryan Venus or Aphrodite.

Lastly, the plant indicated is perhaps the Fraxinella or “gas plant.”   Indeed the plant often goes by the name of “burning bush.” The commonly pink flowered Fraxinella produces volatile oils that can, in hot weather, ignite spontaneously into a flash of flame. The strongest support in evidence of this thesis appears in the Hebrew.

There, the word milah, מֵילָה, means “ash,” “fraxinella” and, euphemistically, “circumcision.”   Hence, again, we gain the sense of the Aryan Venus being taken from the Aryan Caelus by the castrating or circumcising Jewish Saturn. Certainly it is possible as well that the “burning bush” as a symbol in this context, has some relation to vaginal pubic hair. Again, especially among the more abiding symbols, we encounter double metaphors and layers of meaning.

Whatever plant is indicated, as this study reveals, its most important feature may be that it has a red fruit, leaf, flower or flame, contrasted with a green stem, leaves or vine. Indeed, with the burning bush, we may find a tidy conflation of fire, rose, blood, circumcision and wine symbolism, all of which relate to the Aryan and Semitic intermixture.

 

 

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