Easter is a reference to the Sacred Whores Ishtar and Queen Esther

The word Easter is clearly derived from the name of the Goddess Ishtar if also the Biblical figure Esther. This is meaningful. For all the Symbolic Synonyms of Venus Pandemos, none are so closely associated with sacred prostitution than Ishtar. Hence, as with the word Sin, we see English words appearing via Promethean transmission in Christianity, referencing ancient Mesopotamia.

This origin of the word Easter, as a reference to Ishtar, generally disregarded, was first presented by Alexander Hislop. Hislop was an anti-Catholic, “Free Church of Scotland” minister who came to describe the Catholic Church as a Babylonian mystery cult.

To be sure, his book The Two Babylons,[1] first published in pamphlet form in 1853, is deeply flawed. To begin with it argues the absurd premise that Constantine’s Church “grafted” pagan symbols on to an otherwise pure Christian scripture. But, of course, as this study reveals, and as any sober, cursory investigation will make obvious, Christianity is, at its core, derived of and, in fact, a deliberate continuation of these Dying-And-Rising Mystery cults, from Dumuzid down. This is, of course, not to criticize Hislop on this basis. Hislop, after all, was operating on limited information in a society still relatively steeped in Christian propaganda if moving away from Catholicism.

The word Easter originates from a book entitled The Reckoning of Time written by the 8th Century Christian monk Bede. There Bede asserts that Ēosturmōnaþ was a name of an English month that corresponded with April. This month was ostensibly named after the local Anglo-Saxon deity Eostre who was celebrated during the month. In contrast, in the Babylonian calendar, we find Ishtar presiding over Araḫ Ulūlu, a month corresponding with August/September. However, we should consider the possibility that Bede, a priest of an entirely obscure origin and likely, in my estimation, a Jew, is being coy here.

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The word Easter originates from a book entitled The Reckoning of Time written by the 8th Century Christian monk Bede. There Bede asserts that Ēosturmōnaþ was a name of an English month that corresponded with April. This month was ostensibly named after the local Anglo-Saxon deity Eostre who was celebrated during the month. In contrast, in the Babylonian calendar, we find Ishtar presiding over Araḫ Ulūlu, a month corresponding with August/September. However, we should consider the possibility that Bede, a priest of an entirely obscure origin and likely, in my estimation, a Jew, is being coy here.

Indeed, in the Greco-Roman world the month of April was sacred to the Goddess Venus with her Veneralia being held on the first day. One possible derivation, considered broadly by mythographers and etymologist, is that name April derives ultimately from Apru, an Etruscan borrowing of the Greek Aphrodite. Here we should understand, as any good esotericist such as Bede would, that Venus, Aphrodite and Ishtar, are Symbolic Synonyms, with Venus being the most recent incarnation prior to Mary. Indeed, strikingly, it appears the “Christian” monk Bede or his hidden “Church sources” understood this.

Likewise, this connection to Venus goes a great distance in explaining the “pagan” tradition of “Easter bunnies.” After all, rabbits as a symbol of fertility were sacred to Venus and were exchanged as gifts by lovers in her honor. In contrast, the English deity Eostre is an entirely obscure figure whom, in the Medieval and ancient context, appears only in Bede’s work. To wit, almost certainly Bede invented her by a common “God Masking” we see with the contemporary Jewish comic book writer. Contextually as well though, connecting Easter and especially Christ’s resurrection to Ishtar makes sense.

Christ is a Symbolic Synonym of Ishtar’s consort Tammuz or Dumuzid whom is also closely related to the Phoenician God Adonis, another important Symbolic Synonym of Christ. Appropriately, the rebirth of Christ, a Dying-and-Rising, vegetation God, is held in honor of Ishtar, who, like Venus, is herself a Symbolic Synonym of Mary. “Mary,” as we will explore, is a Triple Goddess, virgin, consort and mother of Christ.

Hence, with Easter, the mother of Christ, or the mother of the Jewish God, in his rising or “rebirthing form,” is celebrated. As this study explicates, this Triple Goddess is also the tomb, “Hell” or womb that Christ rises from. Indeed, the Goddess Hel appearing in the Norse Myth is a Symbolic Synonym of the Semitized form of Venus or Mary, Persephone, Queen of the Underworld.

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Likewise, this connection to Venus goes a great distance in explaining the “pagan” tradition of “Easter bunnies.” After all, rabbits as a symbol of fertility were sacred to Venus and were exchanged as gifts by lovers in her honor. In contrast, the English deity Eostre is an entirely obscure figure whom, in the Medieval and ancient context, appears only in Bede’s work.

That Easter is also a reference to Esther, who is herself a reference to Ishtar, is also strikingly important.  This seems likely as Easter is developed within the Biblical tradition of Christianity.  Indeed in the Book of Esther we find the figure of Ishtar developed. By this connection we find the Christian spring Holiday of Easter related to the autumn Jewish Holiday of Yom Kippur if also the April Holiday of Passover. Yom Kippur is the most important Holiday in the Jewish Calendar.

During Yom Kippur the Book of Esther plays a central role. As explicated in this study, Esther was a queen of the Persian King Ahasuerus and an important parabolic advocate of the Jews. There, through womanly wiles and a sexual relationship with the King, she outmaneuvers the anti-Semitic figure of Haman. This leads to Haman’s execution. Haman as this study explicates is best understood as an archetype representing the Aryan race in macrocosm, particularly in a self-advocating form.

Whether Esther was a Jewess herself or, as seems more likely, an Aryan woman adopted as a young girl and groomed by the Jew Mordecai into fealty with Judaism, is a question this study considers. In any case, as a symbol she represents at best a Jewess who has tricked and defeated an Aryan competitor. More likely she represents that common contemporary figure of the Aryan sacred whore fighting against the Aryan man on the behalf of Yahweh or the Jewish man.

Perhaps it is meaningful that Jews celebrate this figure of Esther, who represents the corruption of Aryan woman, in the fall, while she is given to Christians to celebrate in the spring. Hence the model of the Sacred Whore is esoterically inserted among Aryans as a symbol of ascension and healthy fertility.

Read related articles: Christmas, The Saturnalia and The Jewish Saturn  and here: Holidays

I discuss Easter with my co-host “Ed”:

 

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