Celtic Mythology as example of Promethean Transmission

The tone of the Celtic myth, as it has come down to us, is wholly distinct from the Norse myth. Here we encounter less youthful anxiety, cataclysmic violence, gallows’ humor and simple madness. Though there is certainly violence and warriorhood.

Readers may not have to be reminded that the Celts, particularly in the regions from which these myths originate, such as Ireland and Wales, are of a more admixed nature than the Nordic types that would come to dominate. Here “Phoenician” admixture is perhaps likely. The Pataikoi that the Phoenicians bore on the front of their ships, refers to the proto-Jewish Ptah or Vulcan.

On the other hand, Promethean Transmission may have occurred at any later point via merchants, priests, shamans or “druids,” and perhaps at a much later date.  And our suspicion is merely increased here with the appearance of Biblical figures like Lamech and Noah in central Celtic texts such as Rawlinson B 502.  And again, as with Norse myth, we receive this myth in the medieval period via monasterial hands.

With the Celts we see a “Germanic tribe” at a different life stage, with a Semitic admixture more far advanced. Perhaps as well, in some cases, distance from a potent and militarized empire creates a calmer tone. With the Chthonic figure of Dagda, an earth God whom bears a cauldron and a club or hammer, we find that the Semitic element has ascended. Here he is the Chieftain God, ostensibly a relatively ancient God.

Indeed, the Interpretatio Romana records the Gauls or Celts to have followed Heracles or Mercury. The Cauldron as well as a symbol, often connected to the Holy Grail, plays saliently in Celtic myth. Here it even appears as a cauldron of rebirth, a central vaginal symbol, where men enter and emerge changed, sometimes for the worse. Here we find “baptism,” intermixture and so forth. Here we find some Jungian precedent for America’s “Melting Pot” which may have developed as a conscious reference to symbols also found in Vulcan’s forge.

Dagda’s name derives from the proto-Celtic Dagodeiwos meaning “The good God” or “The Great God.”  The epithet “Great” as this study discusses is a Jewish and proto-Jewish identifier in JEM.  Tendentious etymologists wonder if it also derives from the proto-Indo-European Dhagho-deiwos meaning “shining” which suggests the diurnal.  Yet this Celtic God was much more likely named intelligently by people speaking a proto-Celtic language assigning name meaning through an understanding of this language.  His epithet Aed, meaning “fiery one,” is suggestive and may suggest him as a Semitic fire God, akin to Vulcan and Yahweh. Like Bacchus and Mercury he is also indicated a phallic God.

People will point to a “sunny” or “Apollonian nature” of Celtic myth while sometimes using Lugh and the hero Cuchulain as examples.  This contrast arrises especially vis-a-vis Norse Myth.  Of course, with Lugh, we in truth find a Mercurial figure.  Experts in Myth concede this, believing Lugh perhaps the unnamed Gaulish God that Julius Caesar connected to Mercury. Indeed, it is often believed that this trickster God was the inspiration for the deceitful, wealth-bearing Leprechaun, one of the most “Jewish” figures to appear in myth.

Lugh’s most famous act, slaying the one eyed Balor with a sling, is almost certainly a reference to Odysseus’ blinding of the Cyclops.  It seems also very likely a reference to the Biblical David’s slaying of Goliath.  If one were to argue Aryan Barbarians developed this parable, he’d have to concede that he “Bowdlerized it.”  Of course the sophisticated use of symbol and myth here, where two Semitic figures, one appearing in the Bible and the other appearing in Homer, are intelligently conjoined, makes this conclusion outright risible. Lugh’s fiery spear is also suspicious.  This symbol appears to put him in the company of Semitic Fire Gods such as Prometheus, Yahweh and Vulcan.

Confusion appears here because Balor leads the Fomorians, a group of Giants often considered Chthonic.  Hence it is naturally assumed we see a conflict between Solar Aryan powers and Chthonic Semitic powers.  Yet modern and ancient JEM reveals that conflicts between Semitic figures is entirely common in Jewish and proto-Jewish art.  We see this between Set and Osiris, Typhon and Bacchus, the Pharisees and Christ, Odin and Loki, Magneto and Professor X or The Incredible Hulk and The Leader.  This is what we call the Caducean Phenomenon, a phenomenon persisting also in the real world as this study describes. With figures like Stan Lee’s Skrull, we are assured no depiction of Jewry, or the forces it allies with, is too unflattering, including the Fomorians.

It’s been suggested that the Formorians describe a group that is African in origin.  Doubtlessly this arises from Gregory Keating’s History of Ireland indicating them as descended from Ham.  Whether or not such a suggestion was the intention of Keating’s possible “retcon,” descendants of Ham, as this study discusses, which include Nimrod or the Canaanites, do not indicate negroes or dark men in the parabolic Biblical genealogies, even if many of the lands the sons of Ham would inhabit would become, historically, non-White.

The Fomorians are also described as sometimes missing a single arm, leg or eye.  This does not however necessarily suggest them as genetic misfits.  Rather we may see here the Hamsa motif where eyes, hands and soles of feet, for instance, are given a sexual significance.  If so, this would indicate them as sexually cuckolded or demoted.  Lugh’s piercing of Balor’s one eye would corroborate this as we will discuss.  Indeed, there are instances of Formorians being beautiful such as is the case with Elatha and Bres, the latter whom carries the epithet “the beautiful.”  Hence the notion that the Fomorians were “monstrous” is not wholly correct.

The Fomorians are Giants and sea raiders, perhaps etymologically connected to the ocean, and may, in the end, find their closest analog in the Jotuns of Norse myth, as many experts have pointed out.  In a relationship similar to that between the Aesir and the Jotuns, the Fomorians will intermix with the Tuatha de Danann.  As this study relates, the Jotuns are likely a caricature of the Hyperborean Giants of Greek myth whom are certainly Aryan figures.  We remember Apollo is given the appellation “the Hyperborean.”  In fact the one-eyed Balor may even be a reference to the one-eyed Odin, if also the Cyclops of Homeric fame.  Thus what is perhaps described is a viking-like, Nordic invading group, with Semitized Aesir leadership.  This fits well with our understanding of the history of Celtic peoples.

That Balor’s one-eye is often consider a sun symbol is likely also meaningful.  First it posits Lugh as oppositional to a sun symbol. Further, as this study discusses, the eye in JEM has appeared commonly as a vaginal symbol and especially an Aryan vaginal symbol.  We see this especially with the blue-eyed Hamsa as this study discusses.  Here we see a possible inspiration for George Martin’s one-eyed Wight giant who is given a shining blue eye. In that case it is pierced by the Semitic Dragon glass, a clear phallic reference.

Regardless the puncturing of the Balor’s eye, akin to the puncturing of Samson’s eyes, who is also a solar figure, fits in well with reoccurring motifs in JEM.  Samson the reader will be reminded, means “man of the son.” Here potential we see indicated, esoterically, a Semitic sexual victory versus Aryan competitors.

Cuchulain, for his part, is less Apollonian than he is “Michaeline” and “Angelic,” if he is even this.  Indeed, he is the son of the Mercurial Lugh and is sometimes understood as an incarnation of Lugh.  Interesting though he derives his name from Culann. His name means Culann’s hound. Culann is a Vulcanian smith figure, like Regin.  Regin is the smith in Norse Myth under whom the ostensibly Apollonian Sigurd apprentices.

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People will point to the Apollonian nature of Celtic myth and especially to figures like Lugh and the hero Cuchulain. Again, Dagda is king here. They are in the end more “Michaeline” and “Angelic” than Apollonian. Cuchulain, for his part, derives his name from Culann. His name means Culann’s hound. Culann is a Vulcanian smith figure, like Regin, under whom the Apollonian Sigurd apprentices.

Yet the dramatic conflict that appears between Regin and Sigurd on the eve of Ragnarok is absent here. The Celts went quietly into the night, becoming less and less meaningful peoples on the world stage. Indeed, Celtic Myth is a world obsessed with the afterworld and otherworlds, where the veil between reality and dream is paper thin. The Arthurian Avalon, for example, comes especially from this myth body and not from a blood hungry Valhalla. Here again we see the “down going.”

The Tuatha de Danann though become the final symbol of the Celts. Here it is understood a noble, ancient race of Elves, ceded the world, went to live in sidhes underground. In plain English, the more racially youthful Nordic element disappeared. It is correct to relate the Tuatha de Danann to the Light Elves of Norse myth, noble, sacrificing, dwindling, Angelic Nords under Semitic direction.  As it concerns this myth body, never forget the most important point, their Chieftain God Dagda is Chthonic and Semitic.  Really, little else matters from here.

Norse myth is intelligent, clever, witty, brutal Celtic myth is astonishingly beautiful and enchanting if also wane and tragic. We require beautiful, intelligent and Aryan. The only sadness in our Art is that that depicts the passing of a great and worthy enemy, because, tragically, it was either us or him. We learn from everything with the discerning eye, with Interpretatio Romana.

 

 

5 thoughts on “Celtic Mythology as example of Promethean Transmission

  1. It is crucially important to note that, like the gods of Nordic myth, the Celtic deities and heroes are half-breeds with the blood of “formorians” who were a monstrous race, imagined to be of African origin. Keep in mind also the “Black Irish”, this population which is thought to descend from the armada is actually of Ancient Greek origin, lending credence to your suppositions about the Greek cults. This is of course not to suggest that the Irish race as a whole is in some way tainted, but the English, both Norman and Anglosaxon, certainly felt this way. Note also their weaponisation against the blonde Ancien Régieme, and that only the visigothic stock of Spain could truly have been said to keep their liempieza de sangre.

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    1. Thank you for your remark. I’ve added a response in the article: “It’s been suggested that the Formorians describe a group that is African in origin. Doubtlessly this arises from Gregory Keating’s History of Ireland indicating them as descended from Ham. Whether or not such a suggestion was the intention of Keating’s possible “retcon,” descendants of Ham, as this study discusses, which include Nimrod or the Canaanites, do not indicate negroes or dark men in the parabolic Biblical genealogies, even if many of the lands the sons of Ham would inhabit would become, historically, non-White.

      The Fomorians are also described as sometimes missing a single arm, leg or eye. This does not however necessarily suggest them as genetic misfits. Rather we may see here the Hamsa motif where eyes, hands and soles of feet, for instance, are given a sexual significance. If so, this would indicate them as sexually cuckolded or demoted. Lugh’s piercing of Balor’s one eye would corroborate this as we will discuss. Indeed, there are instances of Formorians being beautiful such as is the case with Elatha and Bres, the latter whom carries the epithet “the beautiful.” Hence the notion that the Fomorians were “monstrous” is not wholly correct.” Doubtless the “black Irish” point to a racial admixture. I’m uncertain though that the Fomorians refer to the “darker element.” They may refer to an invading Nordic group.

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