The Color Green, Robin Hood & May Day

Green we have already discussed. In JEM it references the Green-skinned god Osiris, the Green Vine of Bacchus or Christ, the Green rose stem of Adonis and Christ, the Green mistletoe leaves of Balder, the Green holly leaves of Christ and the mysterious Green Man of medieval cathedral architecture.

Green also represents the Serpent and the Dragon. In the future it will be associated with Shrek, the Green Lantern,[1] the Incredible Hulk and his caducean opponent, the Leader. In short, in JEM, it represents the Jewish man or Yahweh.

Let’s consider some salient examples of JEM bearing this symbolism. The Green clad, democratic figure of Robin Hood represents a Semitic figure. Indeed, his consort, Lady Marion is clearly a reference to the Marys of the New Testament. The name Robin, on the other hand, is, in this context, of obscure and unknown origin.

Possibly the name Robin was developed as a reference to the “Outlaw King” Robert the Bruce, who again, is indicated in the JEM as Jewish, Davidic figure. The name Robin appears in the Old French as a diminutive of Robert. Though forms of the name “Robinhood,” if not the legend, appear to predate Robert the Bruce’s exploits and may have already carried an association with outlawry. This, by itself, does nothing to significantly injure our speculations though. After all, artists and mythmakers commonly use existing names in clever, highly deliberate and meaningful ways as this study makes clear.

The Redbreasted Robin will eventually appear in Christian symbolism as a reference to a bleeding Christ and perhaps there is a connection there with this bird and Robin Hood, both clear symbols of springtime as we will shortly see. More convincing to the understanding of Robin Hood as a Semitic figure is the figure of Little John, who like John the Baptist, serves as a kind of sidekick and is perhaps very likely a reference to John the Baptist. Indeed, both Little John and John the Baptist are priest figures. The name John itself becomes a common Jewish Identifier in contemporary JEM as this study explicates.

It’s possible the word Hood, suggesting Robin Hood’s outlaw nature, is also a reference to Jewish crypsis or concealment. In fact the character himself, a robber of nobles and a socialist, is very much in line with a Jewish character. Robin Hood would fit in easily with contemporary Jewish comic book myths. That he is an archer, suggests him as derivative of other Semitic archers vying for Aryan Goddesses, such as Orion and Adonis.

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It’s possible the word Hood, suggesting Robin Hood’s outlaw nature, is also a reference to Jewish crypsis or concealment. In fact the character himself, a robber of nobles and a socialist, is very much in line with a Jewish character. Robin Hood would fit in easily with contemporary Jewish comic book myths. That he is an archer, suggests him as derivative of other Semitic archers vying for Aryan Goddesses, such as Orion and Adonis.

Both Robin Hood and Lady Marion are springtime figures connected to the medieval Mayday celebrations in England where Robin Hood became understood as the “May King.” Hence Robin Hood himself is suggested as a Dying and Rising springtime God. We have already discussed the significance of the month of May, particularly in the ancient world, where it came to replace the Apollonian Thargelion. Again, the name of the month itself, a reference to the Semitic Oread Maia, seems to suggest a Semitic “cultural” triumph.

The Mayday ritual has the same source. Indeed, in my estimation the wrapping of the ribbons around the maypole may represent Semitic vines entwining an Aryan tree, hence as well, the “love affair” between the Jewish Christ, Adonis or Bacchus and the Aryan Mary or Venus. This pairing is repeated, of course, as well, with the green-clad Robin Hood or “May King” and Marion. In this way it would repeat crucifixion symbolism, where again the Jewish vine is attached to the Aryan tree.

The color Green has long been connected to Spring, sex and sexual availability. Interestingly, in Victorian England, it was associated with homosexuality. In AIM we will classify it as a fundamentally feminine color.

With Green in JEM, we ostensibly see something distinct from the tree symbol assigned to Aryans. There Green is a reference to plants, particularly to vines and parasitic climbing plants, particularly also to the ephemeral and seasonal.

As mentioned, there are two conflicting notions of Spring appearing in myth, one assigned to Apollo and the Aryan and the second assigned to Jews or proto-Jews via figures like Adonis. Thus the Dying-and-Rising Gods Christ, Adonis and Robin Hood represent to us no more a symbol of Spring than the contemporary expression “Arab Spring.”

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As mentioned, there are two conflicting notions of Spring appearing in myth, one assigned to Apollo and the Aryan and the second assigned to Jews or proto-Jews via figures like Adonis. Thus the Dying-and-Rising Gods Christ, Adonis and Robin Hood represent to us no more a symbol of Spring than the contemporary expression “Arab Spring.”

Hence we find that while Adonis and Bacchus are, in the end, the same Semitic figure, the first is given Spring in the myths and the second is given Winter. Thus there appears a “Battle for Spring” and all its positive associations with fertility and life. Of course, it is a battle for the desired Aryan womb, represented by figures like Venus and Marion, and fertility more generally.

I have already indicated that we should position ourselves above the seasonal while understanding ourselves controllers of the seasons. Yet what does or what should Green indicate in the AIM? Does it need mean only the Green of the Semitic grape vine and bindweed? Can it not also mean simply the Green of the Aryan Oak tree in bloom? Of course the last is a rhetorical question.

Certainly Green should represent a color inferior to celestial colors, such as Gold, White and Blue. This is true as much as the green of the forest is inferior to its father above, The Sun, the clouds and The Sky. This is true as much as the Gold-haired, fair-skinned, Blue-eyed Aryan is superior to the world over which he rules and over which he must rule.

Yet we should work to loosen Green’s association with the Semitic while remaining forever mindful of this association in JEM and their mythmaking. This is especially true because of the color Green’s connection to the arboreal, our stock, that larger unconscious, passive, feminine part of our race, we “Suns” consciously breed.

To the extent Green is associated with Jews but also a feminine element, it becomes a wonderful metaphor for the feminine approach of Jewish crypsis and of the effeminate, indirect, ingratiating Bacchus more generally. As the serpent or vine, Bacchus or Judah camouflages himself among the leaves of the Aryan tree.

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To the extent Green is associated with Jews but also a feminine element, it becomes a wonderful metaphor for the feminine approach of Jewish crypsis and of the effeminate, indirect, ingratiating Bacchus more generally. As the serpent or vine, Bacchus or Judah camouflages himself among the leaves of the Aryan tree.

As with all the colors, one should pay close attention to Green’s use in Art and Religion. In every case, we should avoid its combination with the color Red. But we already know, instinctively, these tacky, Christmas colors “to clash.” We capitulate to them only because of some hokie, lazy, unthinking, goofy-eyed love of “tradition.” Green should be understood as a feminine color, symbolizing the blooming of Diana Silvia, in reaction to Apollo Sol.

Regardless, in Spring we Aryans honor Apollo and celebrate Thargelia. So chin up, White man, and feel no sorrow for the passing of Saturn but rather joy for the approach of Apollo.

 

[1] The second Green Lantern, Hal Jordan, and the character Green Arrow both appear to be indicated as dominated Aryans. Here clothing, something worn and not necessarily innate, may be part of the consideration.

One thought on “The Color Green, Robin Hood & May Day

  1. “The color Green has long been connected to Spring, sex and sexual availability.” Very true. I remember some older kid in school telling me this long ago

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