The Church Tabernacle as Reference to Yahweh’s Fornication with Sarah

Traditionally medieval Churches contained the Tabernacle[1] a receptacle for the Eucharist. In design, the Tabernacle is an ornamental chest or cabinet. In contemporary churches this Tabernacle is now commonly found on the altar. The word Tabernacle itself, though, is derived from the Latin tabernaculum meaning “tent” especially “a tent of an augur” which is a diminutive of taberna, meaning “hut,” “cabin” or “booth.”

This receptacle is a reference to the Tent of Meeting or Tent of Feasts in the Hebrew Bible. In fact the tabernacle is typically covered with a tent-like veil called a conopaeum when containing the Eucharist, as a way of honoring the original Tent of Meeting.

The Tent of Meeting was the tent to which the “sheep” and livestock animals were led to be “sacrificed” in the “fire”  of “Yahweh,” [2]  in Biblical accounts. This study argues that the Tent of Meeting  is itself a reference to a Tent appearing in Genesis 18 where it is implied the Jewish Yahweh conceives Isaac with Abraham’s wife, the Aryan Sarah.[3] Here Sarah is indicated the “sacrificial” goat or livestock.

Regardless it is fitting that the Eucharist or “Lord’s Supper,” is contained within this vessel which is in turn a reference to the Tent of Feasts in the Hebrew Bible. After all, the Last Supper itself is a reference to the Tent of Feasts where lambs and bread were among the offerings to Yahweh. Here, of course, we remember Christ to be represented by both these symbols.

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The Tent of Meeting was the tent to which the “sheep” and livestock animals were led to be “sacrificed” in the “fire”  of “Yahweh,” [2]  in Biblical accounts. This study argues that the Tent of Meeting  is itself a reference to a Tent appearing in Genesis 18 where it is implied the Jewish Yahweh conceives Isaac with Abraham’s wife, the Aryan Sarah.[3] Here Sarah is indicated the “sacrificial” goat or livestock.
In Leviticus, interestingly, we find a restriction is given to Aaron and his sons only. There it says: “You and your sons are not to drink wine or strong drink when you enter the Tent of Meeting, or else you will die; this is a perpetual statute for the generations to come.”[4]

This study discusses how the blood wine in Christian symbolism itself might be understood as not merely the blood of Christ but the blood of Bacchus, whom Christ references, as well as Jewish blood more generally.[5] In other words, here blood is understood in the ancestral sense. Thus as discussed in this study, drinking the wine is symbolically admixture with Jewry.[6]

Hence the probation in Leviticus, against the Aaronic priests drinking wine, is possibly both a prohibition against alcoholism/degeneracy and the diluting of a certain admixed blood alchemy maintained by Jews in Aryan lands. According to the mythology of Judaism, Aaron and his sons ostensibly constitute the line of the kohanim, the Jewish priest class. However, Aaron, closely associated with the phallic serpent staff that he wielded in Exodus, perhaps represents, esoterically, a protective, admixing cryto-element of Jewry, rather than an explicit rabbinate as is often assumed.

Certainly in Leviticus, Aaron and his sons are shown as given privileged access to the flesh of the livestock. Yet we should consider it meaningful that Aaron and his sons are distinct from a commanding Yahweh, who represents the tribe of Judah more generally. Likewise Aaron is distinct from Moses, appearing as his more articulate representative or front man, in the manner Moses, in turn, represents a front man for Yahweh. The Mercurial archetype of Aaron may even find a synonym in the Christian priest.[7] After all, in the Hebrew Bible, Yahweh, Moses and Aaron command the Israelites, a people we understand to represents Aryans more generally if also containing crypto-Jewish elements or tribes.

Holman_Consecration_of_Aaron_and_His_Sons.jpg
Certainly in Leviticus, Aaron and his sons are shown as given privileged access to the flesh of the livestock. Yet we should consider it meaningful that Aaron and his sons are distinct from a commanding Yahweh, who represents the tribe of Judah more generally. Likewise Aaron is distinct from Moses, appearing as his more articulate representative or front man, in the manner Moses, in turn, represents a front man for Yahweh. The Mercurial archetype of Aaron may even find a synonym in the Christian priest.

Regardless what is ultimately described in the Tent of Meeting is the sexual mingling or “meeting” of Aryan stock, the livestock in the metaphor, and a Jewish sexual and racial competitor, the consuming Fire God Yahweh. The chapter entitled Jewish Notions of “Cleanliness” and “Holiness:” The Aryan as “Discharge,” “Leprosy” and “Holy” Prostitute in the first book of this series covers this in detail particularly in the context of Leviticus.

One of the words for Tabernacle in the Hebrew Bible is mishkan, מִשְׁכַּן,  Yet in the Modern Hebrew it may mean “tabernacle,” “sanctuary,” “house,” “home,” or “temple.” In any case, it is understood that the Church or House of the Lord itself might be regarded a representation of the Tent of Meeting which was the home of the Jewish God Yahweh during Exodus. Today English dictionaries define “tabernacle” as “any place of worship, especially one designed for a large congregation.” Definitions like this are commonly the first sense given, with “temporary dwelling or tent”  or “the Israelites’ portable sanctuary” listed second, third or fourth.

The medieval iconography reinforces the idea of Church as Tent of Meeting. There the receptacle that holds the Eucharist, “the tabernacle,” was often designed in the form of a miniature Church or cathedral. As this study discusses, houses, tents and temples, may represent Aryan vaginal symbols in JEM.[8] Regardless Tent of Meeting equals Tabernacle (the Church receptacle), tabernacle (the Church receptacle) equals Church. As with the Tent of Meeting, in the Church “the flock” surrenders, supplicates or “sacrifices” themselves at the altar to Yahweh or Jesus.[9]

Hence it is both fitting that we find the Altar inside the Church and that the Eucharist receptacle we call the Tabernacle upon the altar or at least placed upon it during service. After all, the Church altar is a reference to the mizbeach, מִזְבֵּחַ, the original altar appearing in the Hebrew Bible. The first altar mentioned in the Hebrew Bible is Noah’s. It is there called mizbeach, מִזְבֵּחַ, and comes from root zabach, זָבַח, which means to “slaughter for sacrifice.”  This, of course, describes the function of an altar. This mizbeach is a stone or made of stone or stones in the Hebrew accounts. It is simultaneously a phallic symbol and a reference to the Jewish God.[10]  Thus the tabernacle upon the altar carries the identical meaning as Peter as the “rock” upon which Christ built his Church.[11]

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Hence it is both fitting that we find the Altar inside the Church and that the Eucharist receptacle we call the Tabernacle upon the altar or at least placed upon it during service. After all, the Church altar is a reference to the mizbeach, מִזְבֵּחַ, the original altar appearing in the Hebrew Bible. The first altar mentioned in the Hebrew Bible is Noah’s. It is there called mizbeach, מִזְבֵּחַ, and comes from root zabach, זָבַח, which means to “slaughter for sacrifice.”  This, of course, describes the function of an altar. This mizbeach is a stone or made of stone or stones in the Hebrew accounts. It is simultaneously a phallic symbol and a reference to the Jewish God.

That the rock is a phallic symbol is corroborated by the understanding that livestock animals, representing the Aryan, were “sacrificed” or “burned” on the altars.  For instance, in Deuteronomy 27:6 it says: “You shall build the altar of Yahweh your God with uncut stones and offer upon it burnt offerings to Yahweh your God.” In Leviticus 6:13 it says “The fire shall be kept burning on the altar continually; it must not be extinguished.”

The Censer: a Symbol for The Consumption of the Aryan Laban

More explicit references are found to the burning of Aryan as resource in the symbol of the censer or thurible appearing in High Church ritual. The censer, a vessel designed to burn incense, is alit during liturgical services and swung through the air to disseminate the smoke.

Santiago_Catedral_Botafumeiro.png
More explicit references are found to the burning of Aryan as resource in the symbol of the censer or thurible appearing in High Church ritual. The censer, a vessel designed to burn incense, is alit during liturgical services and swung through the air to disseminate the smoke.

Ostensibly the smoke represents prayers and pleadings of the mass rising to heaven. Revelation 8:4-5 provides some precedent for this: “the smoke of the incense, together with the prayers of the saints, rose up before God from the hand of the angel. Then the angel took the censer, filled it with fire from the altar, and hurled it to the earth.” This is a potent metaphor as we understand the smoke also to represent the incineration of the Aryan flesh. Here Yahweh appears to take on a mocking, merciless aspect in the face of consumed, pleading, begging Aryans. The revenge is exacted through Jesus whose name means possibly “Yahweh’s saves” but perhaps most likely “Yahweh Avenges.”[12]  Here again we remember Yahweh is a synonym for Jewry.[13]

Indeed, the word for censer in the New Testament, including in the passage above, is libanótos meaning frankincense. The word comes from libanos originating from the Semitic word of lebonah, לְבוֹנָה, likewise meaning Frankincense. Lebonah derives from the word Laban meaning “white” or “to be white.” As this study discusses, this is a racial term perhaps best illuminated in Genesis 30, where the proto-Jewish Jacob is depicting darkening and thieving Laban’s white flock, including Laban’s beautiful daughter Rachel, whose name means “ewe.”

This continues the shocking messaging we find in Leviticus where the Aryan is understood as burnt offering or even a leprosy to be eliminated.[14] In fact in Exodus 30:34 we learn the ingredients of the Holy consecrated incense as relayed directly by Yahweh to Moses. There we discover, alongside “pure” Frankincense, that more ingredients are references to the Aryan. The blend also includes gum resin,[15] likewise a reference to the Aryan who is understood as arboreal in JEM.

The_Phillip_Medhurst_Picture_Torah_478._The_candlesticks_and_altar_of_incense._Exodus_cap_39_vv_37-38._Mortier.jpg
In Exodus 30:34 we learn the ingredients of the Holy consecrated incense as relayed directly by Yahweh to Moses. There we discover, alongside “pure” Frankincense, that more ingredients are references to the Aryan. The blend also includes gum resin, likewise a reference to the Aryan who is understood as arboreal in JEM. 

The ingredients include galbanum appearing in the Hebrew as chelbenah, חֶלְבְּנָה, which in turn derives from cheleb, חֶלֶב, meaning “fat.” Cheleb is itself related to chalab, חָלָב, meaning “milk.”  Both symbols of “fat” and “milk” found in the famous expressions “the fat of the land”[16] and “a land flowing with milk and honey,”[17] also represent the Aryan as resource.

Lastly the incense contains onycha which appears in the Hebrew as shecheleth, שְׁחֶלֶת. Shecheleth comes from the same root as shachal, שַׁחַל.  In fact, we might guess as well shecheleth is derived from shachal.  Shachal means “lion.”[18] The lion is a symbol representing the Aryan as this study discusses. The Hebrew word Ari, אֲרִי, perhaps best reveals this, meaning both “Aryan” and “Lion” in the modern Hebrew.

The English word censer, arriving from the late Latin incensum meaning literally “that which is burnt.”  Hence the language cleaves close to “burnt offering.” The name censer itself derives from the Old French encens meaning “incense.” The name thurbile likewise ultimately derives from the Greek thyros θύος, meaning “burnt sacrifice.”

It’s speculation, but possibly the word censer is a sly, mocking reference to the Roman censor, the magistrate charged with supervising public morality.  The word censor itself derives from censere meaning to “appraise,” “value” or “judge.” The censor’s role included, as well, ensuring a positive fertility rate among the Roman citizenry, something that almost certainly would have been despised by Jews. Interestingly the incense bowl within the censer is often considered to represent the womb of Mary, who bore the “Divine Fire.”  Hence a theme of women as burnt offerings and the Jewish God as fire is repeated here. These are common, reoccurring symbols and notions in contemporary and ancient JEM.

 

[1] The Tent of Meeting is a reference to the Tent the supposedly housed the God Yahweh during the Exodus. This study argues it is likely a reference to the tent in Genesis 18.  Likewise it is a reference to the suggestion that the Jewish Yahweh cuckolded Abraham in this tent. This Tent of Meeting is discussed at length in book #1 of this series but also see the chapter entitled The Abrahamic Faiths:  The Cuckold’s Faiths & Israel as “God’s Sarah” in book #3 of this study.

[2] Yahweh’s identity as a fire a God, evident in the Hebrew Bible, is tracked and reoccurs as a theme in this study. Also see the chapter entitled Semitic Mountain and Fire Gods in book #2 in this series.

[3] See the chapter entitled The Abrahamic Faiths:  The Cuckold’s Faiths & Israel as “God’s Sarah” in book #3 of this study.

[4] Leviticus 10:9

[5] See the chapter entitled “Blood Magic” and Wine in book #3 of this series.

[6] See the chapters entitled Bread as an Important Example of the “Consumption Motif” and “Blood Magic” and Wine in book #3 of this series.

[7] See the chapter entitled Mercury: The Philosopher, Priest, Biblical Prophet, Apostle and Wizard in book #2 of this series.

[8] See the chapter in this book entitled The Semitic Bride Gathering Cult: A Primary Purpose and Theme of J.E.M. in book #1 of this series.

[9] Jesus’ name means “Yahweh’s Salvation” or perhaps, more likely, “Yahweh’s revenge.”

[10] See the chapter entitled The Stone: A Symbol of the Jewish God in this book and the chapters that follow from it.

[11] This is described in Matthew 16:18: “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.” Peter’s name (Simon’s Gentile name) means “rock.”

[12] See the chapter entitled Jesus Christ, The Most Profound Example of The Importance of Names in JEM in the first book of this series.

[13] See the chapter entitled YHWH, My People as God: An Imitable Concept in book #3 of this series.

[14] See the chapter entitled Jewish Notions of “Cleanliness” and “Holiness:” The Aryan as “Discharge,” “Leprosy” and “Holy” Prostitute in the first book of this series.

[15] See the Chapter entitled The Elements of Water and Wood as Symbols of Aryan Blood in book #2

[16] Genesis 45:18

[17] Exodus 3:17

[18] See the chapter entitled Controlling Logos by Eating the Ears of Lions in book #1 of this series.

3 thoughts on “The Church Tabernacle as Reference to Yahweh’s Fornication with Sarah

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