Vulcan as an Important Form of the Lesser God

Of the ancient “Jewish Gods”, Vulcan is among the ones who is perhaps the most “traceable” from a Mytho-historical perspective. Vulcan also resembles most closely the mysterious, fiery mountain God of Exodus. It’s my assertion as well that Vulcan is the figure that the ancient world would have most readily associated with the figure we now know as the Jew. Here, with the Jewish Mountain God, we find an exiled God for an exiled people. This also becomes a psychological feature of the JEM in the Biblical works. By worshiping an exiled God, we as Aryans become doubly exiled.

Indeed both Campbell and Freud identify Yahweh as a volcano god. Freud posits the highly obscure Arabian Jahve as the origin. Yet it is mistaken or even disingenuous, in my view, to assert that the volcano God alluded to in the Biblical works was simply an obscure volcano God co-opted from another Semitic tribe, even if Jahve was one of his names. In my estimation, he was far more likely the world-famous Vulcan/Hephaestus described in JEM, especially to a Greek and Jewish Greek audience via the Septuagint. This would comport with contemporary and intervening JEM that, as we shall see, continues to reference Vulcan.

After all, even a cursory glance at the contemporaneous ancient religions reveals that Vulcan was a highly unique Volcano god. In fact, one looks in vain for another Volcano God. And, to be sure, a cursory glance is especially appropriate, as Vulcan and his Egyptian equivalent Ptah, were salient in the ancient world in contrast to perhaps other now forgotten or obscure similar Gods. Further, as this study explicates, there is compelling evidence that the Jewish God described in Exodus is indicated as a smith, which would narrow, a strikingly narrow field even further. Vulcan the reader will remember was also, famously, the smith of the Gods.

Sigmund_Freud,_by_Max_Halberstadt_(cropped) (1).jpg
 Both Campbell and Freud identify Yahweh as a volcano god. Freud posits the highly obscure Arabian Jahve as the origin. Yet it is mistaken or even disingenuous, in my view, to assert that the volcano God alluded to in the Biblical works was simply an obscure volcano God co-opted from another Semitic tribe, even if Jahve was one of his names. In my estimation, he was far more likely the world-famous Vulcan/Hephaestus described in JEM, especially to a Greek and Jewish Greek audience via the Septuagint.

Thus, if the Jewish God, as a volcano God, is a reference to any pre-existing, contemporary or synonymous God whether developed by the Jews or proto-Jews themselves or otherwise, he is almost certainly a reference to Vulcan or Hephaestus. Indeed, here, again, we assume JEM functioned then as it does today. To wit, no reference could be too obscure or it would then become non-transmittable, whether to the conscious or unconscious mind. In any case, via Interpretatio Romana we understand the Jewish God in this form as unequivocally Vulcan. But what is the specific evidence that one of the salient forms of the Jewish God is Vulcan?

In the Hebrew Bible references to the Jewish God manifesting through guiding plumes of smoke and columns of fire, accompanied by shuddering mountains, appear saliently. For example, in Isaiah 4:6 it is explained: “The LORD will create over the whole area of Mount Zion and over her assemblies a cloud by day, even smoke, and the brightness of a flaming fire by night; for over all the glory will be a canopy.” It seems certain this describes, as Freud and Campbell assent, a volcano.

Of course, this motif appears most memorably in Exodus when Moses visits with, and is guided by, the mountain god, Yahweh. In the Book of Deuteronomy it is described thusly: “Yahweh our God spoke to us in Horeb, saying, You have dwelt long enough in this mount.”[1] Horeb we should understand here is a mountain, often believed by both Christian and Jewish sources to be synonymous with the more well-known Mount Sinai. Though the name Horeb is likely a key, as we will discover.

The_Ten_Commandments_(Bible_Card).jpg
This motif appears most memorably in Exodus when Moses visits with, and is guided by, the mountain god, Yahweh. In the Book of Deuteronomy it is described thusly: “Yahweh our God spoke to us in Horeb, saying, You have dwelt long enough in this mount.”[1] Horeb we should understand here is a mountain, often believed by both Christian and Jewish sources to be synonymous with the more well-known Mount Sinai. Though the name Horeb is likely a key, as we will discover.
The interaction with Yahweh in Horeb is described thusly:

And you came near and stood under the mountain; and the mountain burned with fire to the midst of heavens, with darkness, clouds and thick darkness. And Yahweh spoke to you out of the midst of the fire: you heard the voice of the words, but saw no likeness; only you heard a voice. Therefore take good heed to your selves, for you saw no manner of likeness on the day that Yahweh spoke to you in Horeb out of the midst of the fire.[2]

Here we even have a sense of entering into a mountain forge, such as was believed to be concealed under Mount Etna in Sicily. Here an embittered, expelled Vulcan issues commands through a veil of smoke. Suddenly the relatively drab Bible, as a work referencing “pagan” mythology, becomes interesting again. With the Bible, the style is deliberately “more realistic,” more intimate. Thus it might be understood as an early form of artistic “realism.” Here we come to understand the deceptive and blurring nature of “realism.”

The reoccurrence of “fire and brimstone” or Gophrith, גָּפְרִית, appearing in the Bible as a favored punishment of the Jewish God, is also likely notable. After all, brimstone or sulfur, as it is more commonly called, is found on earth, near hot springs and volcanoes. This was known in the ancient world where it was mined for fumigants, medicine and bleaching agents.

Thus when the Jewish God “rained on Sodom and Gomorrah brimstone and fire”[3] we are given the image of a volcano God desolating these cities in the manner the decadent Roman city Pompeii was crushed. Indeed, the mud of the salt water Dead Sea is rich in Sulfur. Sulfur, like Salt, is an element that appears in esotericism, whether in Alchemic or Freemasonic symbolism. I assert in this study that Sulfur symbolizes, like Salt, the Semitic or Jewish element.

Interestingly as well the Hebrew Bible conveys the Jewish God, like the Vulcan of Greco-Roman myth, as a nomadic exile. Consider Deuteronomy 31:15: “Then the Lord appeared at the tent in a pillar of cloud, and the cloud stood over the entrance to the tent.” Then Exodus 40:38: “So the cloud of the Lord was over the tabernacle by day and fire was in the cloud by night, in the sight of all the Israelites during all their travels.”

In Exodus The Jewish God says: “Behold, I will stand before you there upon the rock in Horeb; and you shall strike the rock, and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink.” The word Horeb, חֹרֵב, is thought to mean “glowing,” “heat” or “fire” in the ancient context. Today the word is translated as meaning “destroyed,” “ruined,” “parched,” “arid” and also “sword.” Perhaps there is a sense here that the “rock in Horeb” is an anvil in a forge. A formed stone, indeed, was, of course, the earliest from of the anvil if likely obsolete by the writing of the Bible. Yet the rock might easily be intended as a metaphor or figure of speech.

the_forge_of_vulcan.jpg
 Perhaps there is a sense here that the “rock in Horeb” is an anvil in a forge. A formed stone, indeed, was, of course, the earliest from of the anvil if likely obsolete by the writing of the Bible. Yet the rock might easily be intended as a metaphor or figure of speech.

This study explicates that water frequently functions in the JEM as a symbol of Aryan blood. Hence perhaps a metaphor is developed here, where Jews are able to obtain local women through the development of arts or propaganda. After all, Vulcan is first and foremost a temple builder, idol forger and God of artisans. Here “aridness,” even the desert itself, would become a metaphor for a draught of such “resources.”

Psalm 106:19, relating a more famous episode, is more convincing in establishing Horeb as a forge: “They made a calf in Horeb and worshipped the molten image.” Certainly they required a forge to make this molten image. Thus is Horeb intended as a mythical mountain forge? Here we gain a sense of Jews as Idol manufacturers, temple builders, Religion fabricators and master propagandists, precisely as they persist in Hollywood today.

Why is it especially meaningful to us that a salient form of the Jewish God may be identified with Vulcan? The reason lies in the reasons for Vulcan’s expulsion. Consider the following. In the Greco-Roman, we find one version of the tale in which Vulcan is expelled by the Aryan Juno merely for being misshapen, precisely the reason the “Pharmākos” was expelled from the Apollonian cult during the Thragelia.

In another version, Vulcan is expelled by the Aryan Jupiter for taking Juno’s side in an argument. Again, Vulcan is the proto-Feminist or the “intervening” Jew, protecting “the rights,” independence, rebelliousness, masculinity, promiscuity or corruption of the Aryan woman as a means of indirect sexual competition with the Aryan Sky Father. This, of course, is intolerable and rightful grounds for expulsion. How familiar, indeed.

 

[1] Deuteronomy 1:6

[2] 4:11-4:15 Deuteronomy

[3] Genesis 19:24

2 thoughts on “Vulcan as an Important Form of the Lesser God

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s