Homosexuality Part VII: The Aryan Jonah and the Pederastic Synagogue

The Book of Jonah is kept sacred in Judaism and is read during an afternoon prayer during Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year in Judaism. In the New Testament, it is discussed in both Luke and Matthew, and still enjoyed by Christians today. The tale that comprises it is even retold in the Koran. There Jonah is understood as an apostle of “Allah.”  Mohammad happily proclaims Jonah a “brother” in God. It also has enjoyed a long popularity as a children’s story. In other words, it is no insignificant tale.

All of this is meaningful for the following reason: The Book of Jonah is a parable and plan describing ritualized sexual abuse. As many readers are likely familiar, the Book of Jonah tells the story of a preacher named Jonah who abides a period of three days in the belly of a “whale.”

In the story, Jonah has fallen away from his duties to the Jewish God. Fleeing the “presence” of Jewish God, Jonah boards a ship bound for Tarshish. Aboard the ship, the Jewish God summons a violent storm to obstruct his plan. The sailors draw lots to determine who has offended the God. Jonah draws the short straw. Jonah is then dumped, at his own recommendation, into the ocean where he is swallowed by a “Great fish” or dag gadol as it is rendered in the Hebrew.

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Fleeing the “presence” of Jewish God, Jonah boards a ship bound for Tarshish. Aboard the ship, the Jewish God summons a violent storm to obstruct his plan. The sailors draw lots to determine who has offended the God. Jonah draws the short straw. Jonah is then dumped, at his own recommendation, into the ocean where he is swallowed by a “Great fish” or dag gadol as it is rendered in the Hebrew.

The Jewish God appeased by this gesture calms the raging storm. There, in the belly of the “Great Fish” Jonah resides, praying to the Jewish God for salvation. The Jewish God hears his prayers and three days later he is vomited up on the beach by the “Great Fish.”

Fulfilling his promise, Jonah enters the city of Ninevah and convinces them also to repent before the Jewish God. Soon even the king has abandoned his royal garb for the sackcloth. Here we find a similar theme of non-Jews abandoning worldly things or the “cosmos” at the behest of a trickster, Jewish God. Regardless, the Jewish God, whom had planned on destroying them because of their sin, relents.

Jonah actually expresses disappointment at the Jewish God’s mercy here. After all Jonah had expected that the Jewish God would have destroyed them, feeling the God has been less kind to him. Next Jonah sits outside the city, waiting to see what will happen to it. The Jewish God causes a leafy plant to grow up over his head offering him shade from the sun. But the next morning the Jewish God sends a worm to eat the plant so that once more the sun blazes on Jonah.

Suffering in the heat, Jonah cries “it would be better for me to die.”  The Jewish God in response implies that Jonah should have protected the plant and made it grow. As the parable concludes, the fate of the city is left uncertain with the Jewish God saying “And should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand people who cannot tell their right hand from their left—and also many animals?”[1]

What does it all mean? Again names hold many important clues. Firstly, the name Jonah, יונה, means “Dove” or “Pigeon.” This is a clear reference to Venus, Ishtar or Psyche as well as the feminine Holy Spirit described in the Baptism narrative. Hence, Jonah, though male, is given both a female and Aryan designation. As Christ, a synonym for the Jewish God, is “baptized” by Jonah or the Dove, a similar relationship between the Jewish God and Jonah is implied in this parable. Indeed, Jonah too is baptized or immersed when he falls into the sea. Thus it seems the sexual symbolism of baptism may also apply here.

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The name Jonah, יונה, means “Dove” or “Pigeon.” This is a clear reference to Venus, Ishtar or Psyche as well as the feminine Holy Spirit described in the Baptism narrative. Hence, Jonah, though male, is given both a female and Aryan designation. As Christ, a synonym for the Jewish God, is “baptized” by Jonah or the Dove, a similar relationship between the Jewish God and Jonah is implied in this parable. Indeed, Jonah too is baptized or immersed when he falls into the sea.

There are more hints that the tale describes sexual abuse by a Jewish figure against an Aryan. For instance, we’ll remember that that the symbol of the “Great Fish” or drakon that appears here, in contrast to the river fish or ichthys that appears in the New Testament symbols, is a symbol for Jewry or the Jewish God.

The adjective gadol, גדול, used to describe the Fish is itself telling. In the Biblical Hebrew it means “great” or “greatest.”   As this study explicates, the term “great” or “greatest” is a Jewish identifier in the JEM. Again, the Hebrew term Rav, רַב, meaning Rabbi may also mean “great.” Likewise the phrase Kohen Gadol, כהן גדול, is the title of the High Priests of ancient Israel. This connection to Rabbi’s or Jewish priests is especially important.

Indeed, according to Rabbi Eliezer, one of the most prominent Sages in Judea during the 1st and 2nd century, the “Great fish” that Jonah inhabited was “like a Synagogue” inside, where a pearl illuminated and where the fish’s eyes functioned as windows. Eliezer himself became known as “Eliezer ha-Gadol” or Eliezer the Great.

In Modern Hebrew Gadol, גָּד֔וֹל, may mean “raising” “breeding” “upbringing” “increment” “tumor” or “excrescence.”  Hence, perhaps there is a sense here that Jonah is being “raised,” “bred” or, indeed, sexually groomed by the “Upbringing Fish.”   That Jonah is swallowed by the “Great Fish” conforms to a common “Consumption Motif” found in JEM where the Aryan is understood as resource and the Jew as consumer. It is akin, for example, to Lot eating “unleavened bread” with the Angels in Sodom.

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Indeed, according to Rabbi Eliezer, one of the most prominent Sages in Judea during the 1st and 2nd century, the “Great fish” that Jonah inhabited was “like a Synagogue” inside, where a pearl illuminated and where the fish’s eyes functioned as windows. Eliezer himself became known as “Eliezer ha-Gadol” or Eliezer the Great.

It seems relevant as well that Jonah is fleeing to Tarshish. Here it appears indicated Jonah is fleeing to an Aryan city and thus away from a Jewish capture. Consider, it’s a city historians and archeologists have been unable to identify and may well have been, like other locations in the Bible, invented or chosen especially for its name meaning. It is certainly a reference to Aryans and may function in the story here as some equivalent of Galilee, to wit, “whitetopia.” But how do we know Tarshish is an Aryan symbol?

In the ancient Hebrew “Tarshish” may refer to a number of things, the land mentioned in the tale, a son of Javan, the founder of Tarshish, a Benjamite or a noble person. All of these symbols are Aryan identifiers in the JEM. As a common noun it may refer to a “precious stone” possibly “yellow jasper.” In Modern Hebrew the word Tarshish תַּרְשִׁישׁ means “aquamarine,” “beryl” and “topaz.” The color greenish blue may be suggestive here as well. Possibly suggested as well is “topaz” or the color yellow.

For what it is worth, the colors yellow and blue are celestial colors, and Aryan identifiers as this study discusses. Interestingly Jewish liturgy describes an order of Angels called Tarshishim, תרשישים. Angels are almost always Aryan figures as this study explicates. Tarshishim translates in Modern Hebrew as “sixty,” “aquamarine,” “beryl” and “topaz.”  Sixty is an Aryan identifier as this study explicates. But, perhaps most conclusively, the person of Tarshish, son of Javan, is understood as descended from the Aryan figure of Japheth. Hence “Japhethites” or Aryans are indicated as having settled Tarshish.

The name of the city of Nineveh, נִינְוֶה, may also have been selected because of its name meaning. It possibly means “place of fish.” Hence, possibly, a motif similar to that found in the New Testament, where the Sea of Galilee or the city Magdala Nunayya (“Tower of Fishes”) are understood as places in which “Fishers of Men” gather “Aryan fish.” Fish or Dagan, in contrast to Drakon, as this study reveals emerge as a symbol in JEM for Aryan as consumable resource.

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The name of the city of Nineveh, נִינְוֶה, may also have been selected because of its name meaning. It possibly means “place of fish.” Hence, possibly, a motif similar to that found in the New Testament, where the Sea of Galilee or the city Magdala Nunayya (“Tower of Fishes”) are understood as places in which “Fishers of Men” gather “Aryan fish.” Fish or Dagan, in contrast to Drakon, as this study reveals emerge as a symbol in JEM for Aryan as consumable resource.

The leafy plant at the end of Jonah’s tale is also an interesting detail. The name of the plant in the text is obscure so it may be impossible to gain a complete understanding of this symbol. Generally though it is certainly suggestive of the Jewish God as “Green sprout” or “vine.” The worm that comes to eat it, a tola, תּוֹלָע, may also mean “scarlet” or “crimson.” Hence we may see a repetition of the common red/green plant color symbolism here, appearing with the rose, grapes, holly and so forth.

Perhaps more interestingly here, Jonah’s nemesis is the sweltering sun or Shemesh, שֶׁמֶשׁ. This is, of course, a reference to an Aryan solar element and the God Shemesh, an equivalent of Apollo. Indeed, it’s possible that Jonah expulsion from the ship into the sea and his torment by the sun, all suggest a kind of ancient “homophobia.” So much for the notion of Apollo as a homosexual.

It’s evident that Jonah is distrusted by the sailors. Indeed, they are alarmed when he seeks to rest while the storm is raging rather than seek to propitiate the angry God. Indeed, in general there is something effeminate about his nihilism. It bespeaks of a homosexual depression or the suicidal tendency common among homosexuals. Interestingly it seems the Jewish God’s threat to Jonah is that he will reveal him to the Aryan sun if he doesn’t tend to the Jewish Green sprout. It seems in a manner the Jewish media today have the Catholic Church, and its pederasts, “over the same barrel,” so to speak.

Christians typical view Jonah as a kind of early Avatar of Christ because of some relatively superficial similarities. For instance, Jonah is swallowed by the “Great Fish” and remains in the fish for three days, the same number of days Christ remains in Hades. In Jonah’s case this may suggest a kind of “spiritual” Semitization. The number three, again, is commonly a reference to sexual interaction in JEM. The tale also indicates that the city of Nineveh was so large it took Jonah three days to cross it. Hence it is suggested that Jonah is interacting sexually with its inhabitants.

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Jonah is swallowed by the “Great Fish” and remains in the fish for three days, the same number of days Christ remains in Hades. In Jonah’s case this may suggest a kind of “spiritual” Semitization. The number three, again, is commonly a reference to sexual interaction in JEM. The tale also indicates that the city of Nineveh was so large it took Jonah three days to cross it. Hence it is suggested that Jonah is interacting sexually with its inhabitants.

Regardless, the figures of Jonah and Christ are certainly distinct. One, Jonah, represents a psychologically enslaved Aryan and the other, Christ, represents the Jew. What does this tale ultimately prove even if it, as it seems, describes pederasty and sexual grooming?  Does it suggest that a weaning of priests or useful servants, especially non-Jewish servants of Jews was, in the ancient world, encouraged and occurred in this manner?  It seems that it does.

Does it suggest a kind of sexual abuse still persists in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, developed with the original conscious intent of actually creating priests and defenders of The Jewish God? It actually seems that it does. Indeed, this understanding seems to explain why this otherwise odd and inexplicable tale was passed on at all. Surely it wasn’t to add credibility to the Bible as a document describing actual events. To wit, it had a “deeper” meaning.

More though, as a parable taught to a laity, on a subliminal level, it is JED par excellence. Consider how many Aryans have been taught this tale on the pretext that it was an amazing and interesting tale instructing their children pious subservience to God? It, like the rest of the Biblical works, was teaching them subservience to Christian priests, whom it would seem, did not always have the cleanest of intentions. It seems almost certain this tale, especially appealing to children, functioned as “catamite bait.”

In any case, a new epithet appears in the name Jonah. It describes the non-Jewish homosexual who is faithful to Jewry, whether as a secular or explicitly religious figure. Here the alliance is strategic. Jonah feels Jewry will protect him from the Aryan sun. Jewry or the Jewish God, also, through JEM, made him or “allowed” him, is his “Creator.” Indeed, the figures of Elisha and Elijah will corroborate this.

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A new epithet appears in the name Jonah. It describes the non-Jewish homosexual who is faithful to Jewry, whether as a secular or explicitly religious figure. Here the alliance is strategic. Jonah feels Jewry will protect him from the Aryan sun. Jewry or the Jewish God, also, through JEM, made him or “allowed” him, is his “Creator.”

[1] Jonah 4:11

8 thoughts on “Homosexuality Part VII: The Aryan Jonah and the Pederastic Synagogue

    1. Though I don’t necessarily doubt it, it’s unknown: “Since the classicists of the early 20th century, biblical archaeologists often identify the place-name Tarshish in the Hebrew Bible with Tartessos, though others connect Tarshish to Tarsus in Anatolia or other places as far as India. (See entry for Jonah in the Jewish Encyclopedia.) Tarshish, like Tartessos, is associated with extensive mineral wealth (Iberian Pyrite Belt).” Names though, whether of existing places or invented places, are commonly chosen symbolically in Jewish parable. With the Book of Jonah for instance, we don’t assume it’s about someone being eaten by a whale. Rather language is used carefully and symbolically throughout. The reference you are making is not in that wiki entry, unless I moved through it too quickly. Can you send it if you have it? Of course Jewish history itself is a mix of history and symbolic parable.

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  1. The reference is in the work of Nimrod del Rosario (Felipe Moyano), an argentinian esotericist. His main work is https://es.scribd.com/document/278953370/The-Mystery-of-Belicena-Villca-Complete
    Although most of the work is not available unless having a scribd account.
    Moyano work created a cult movement in the Spanish speaking countries. There are countless spin offs and crazy groups in Latin America for example.
    I believe Moyano could very likely be a jew but in his work he praises Apollo, the aryans and despises the jews. That credit I have to give him.
    As usual, it is a work to take from a parable perspective.
    The story of Tarshish in the book is very interesting. In there it is described how that land was the home of a special elite group of men totally commited to fight against the jews and what they stand for. They were called “The man of stone”. JEM here? Although it has to be taken with a pinch of salt, since there is a deep parable about it: men of hearts of stone, cold as ice, a sort of “armour” against temptations of this world (the tarshishim?).
    Another interesting part of the book is the Nimrod tale, in which, obviosuly, he was an aryan ruler who tried to conquer “heaven by assault”. In other words, a parable about a feared aryan king who went to total war against the enemy. Hence why Yahweh hated him so much.
    As you can notice, most of the work of that man also puts the Bible in a similar way as you do: there is esoteric meaning in every paragraph, and many things should be taken as the opposite of how they are portrayed.
    Indeed, the kohen have been in charge since the beggining.

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  2. A homosexual named Jonah appears in Telltale’s “The Walking Dead: Michonne” video game as a minor character. He is the town doctor paired with a Zachary. The town itself is a boat town called Monroe. Other examples of JEM appear throughout the rest of the video game series, which has many Jewish writers, such as a Kate (triple goddess motif) in season three.

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